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Rick Piloco 2 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – December 22, 2016

MATERIALS

Surface: Rick uses oil pre-primed canvases (not acrylic) on stretcher or mounted on board.  [Rick re-stretched the canvas and used the canvas keys to make the canvas more taught as it was loose.]

Oils: Rick mixes his paint brands and feels that there are some colors that you can not get in particular brands.

Palette: Rick uses two whites: flake white and a lead white; one white is more yellow and the other more blue.

Brushes: Rick prefers to use the largest possible brushes for as long as possible, especially when painting alla prima.  He generally tries to use only two brushes, one for lights and one for dark colors.  Rick uses square, flat, bright or filbert shapes but will use them all depending on what is available.

Medium: Chelsea Classical Studio School of Fine Arts (CCS) lean medium [this version was custom blended for Rick as a test using 50% Spike Oil & 50% home made sun thickened linseed oil).  The regular CCS Lean Medium is 50% linseed oil & 50% Spike Oil.

Rick set up the model [behind left] under a store light [above] and painted her at an angle while she looked in another direction.  The model was angled to have a good balance of light and dark moments.  The canvas is white initially (not pre-tinted) and sits on a tripod travel easel.  Rick prefers to set up his palette on another stand in front of him so that he can easily mix colors and aids while he is teaching/talking.

Rick points out his palette layout and colors.  He arranges the colors darkest on the left to lightest on the right.  He places one warm and one cool version of each basic color next to each other.  He also includes his two whites (see above for description of exact colors).  Rick was using a rectangular palette that was on hand and uses various shapes and sizes with no real preference.  The base color of the palette should be similar to the base color of the canvas you plan to use.  Rick covers the canvas in a neutral warm brown which roughly matches his palette color to make mixing colors easier.  His two mediums are in small cups, his custom CCS medium (see above) and CCS brush cleaner.

Rick shows off the two basic larger brushes that he uses for almost the entire demo (see above for description).

Rick first plans the composition by laying out the basic figure shape, reviewing the angles and proximity to the canvas edges.  He paints in a warm neutral mixture brown.  He draws the basic rough contour.

Rick next establishes the basic NO TAN which is the simple black or white shapes.  Lighter shapes are group with the LIGHTS and darker shapes are grouped and simplified with the DARKS.  The DARKS are painted with the warm neutral brown mix of paint and lights are left the color of the white canvas initially.  Rick draws and fills in the basic simplified dark shapes.

Rick quickly creates the NO TAN, usually within the first 10-15 minutes model sitting.  The painting should have some character and feel of the model because the NO TAN.

In the next 10-15 minute sitting, Rick makes sure that the entire canvas is covered.  He uses a dark or light warm brown.  The light warm brown is used for the “white” of the NO TAN.  Edges and shapes are adjusted.

When covering the lights, Rick will try to match the TONE and HUE (in brown) as best as possible to match the scene.  Rick chose intentionally NOT to match the background TONE to better allow the model to stand out in the final painting.

By the end of the 2nd 10-15 minute sitting, Rick re-inforces the darks and adjusts and refines the shapes and contours.

Over the next few 10-15 minute model sittings, Rick refines the shapes and works progressively smaller but tries to keep all his moves as large as possible, still using the largest brush possible.  Tones and Hues begin to be matched.

In the last 2-3 sittings, Rick introduces white and lights and holds off as long as possible to do this.  He tries to keep his colors as clean as possible, not wanting to mix white or black into his paints.  Here he has started to build up the whites.  But the entire painting has been kept fairly thin and becomes progressively heavier and thicker with paint when he moves to adding the lights.

Rick cools/greys down the background to better match the HUE but still chooses to adjust the TONE to help the figure stand out.

Rick continues to refine the shapes not allowing himself to get to fixed on capturing one aspect.  He moves constantly around on the painting keeping all his gestures and refinements as big as possible, unwilling to “fix” anything before its time.

The painting was completed within 1 hour and 45 minutes.  It was worked up fast and given more time and multiple sittings would be progressively more finished.  Rick believes that you never know when painting from life, how much time you may get; you need to be able to capture the character and feel of the model within a short period of time and his method of creating a NO TAN allows for that.

Explore Rick’s Classes:

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Dominique Medici Free Online Painting Demo – 3 Hour

16. Finally, I felt the body was distracting and not really adding anything to the study. In the last few moments with one or two sweeps of the rag I took out the upper body, leaving the more suggestive sketch from earlier.

16. Finally, I felt the body was distracting and not really adding anything to the study. In the last few moments with one or two sweeps of the rag I took out the upper body, leaving the more suggestive sketch from earlier.

DOMINIQUE MEDICI
FREE ONLINE
PORTRAIT PAINTING DEMONSTRATION
3 HOURS

ABOUT DOMINIQUE MEDICI

Dominique Medici is a NYC-based artist specializing in both Egg tempera and Oil painting. She studied in London and has exhibited internationally, including Art in Action, Royal Society of Portrait Painters, Christies Young Artist Exhibition and the Society of Portrait Painters. She was a semi finalist in 2006 Outwin Boochevor Portrait Completion and recently received an honorable mention in the 2014 Portrait Society of America members show and honorable mention for portraiture during Oil Painters of America’s 24th Annual National Juried Show. Dominique has undertaken numerous international portrait commissions and her work in displayed in many private collections throughout Europe and the US, including Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness.

Dominique has a passion for teaching and has taught extensively both privately and publicly.

Dominique Medici
http://www.facebook.com/dominique.medici

MATERIALS

Drawing: (Winsor & Newton) Blue-Black.

Surface: Masonite Hardboard primed with Oil and a neutral grey/brown wash

Oils: Gamblin ; Winsor & Newton

Palette: Titanium White (Gamblin), Cadmium Yellow Light (Gamblin), Quinacridone Red (Gamblin), Cobalt Teal (Gamblin), Blue Black (Winsor & Newton)

Brushes: Hog Hair Flat or Filbert / Bristle Brush #4 (2) , #6 (2), #8 (1), & Kolinsky Sable #4 (1)

Medium: Chelsea Classical Studio Linseed Oil Pale

Brush Cleaner: Chelsea Classical Studio Lavender Brush Cleaner

00. Setting up the pose and lighting
00. Setting up the pose and lighting
01. Placement, looking at the overall basic shape
01. Placement, looking at the overall basic shape
02. Now considering position and scale
02. Now considering position and scale
03. Beginning ro work out basic proportions
03. Beginning to work out basic proportions
04. Without locking in to much drawing I want to get a basic play of light and shade
04. Without locking in too much drawing I want to get a basic play of light and shade
05. I start using color, looking for the basic underlying color/ halftone for the light and shadow planes respectively
05. I start using color, looking for the basic underlying color/ halftone for the light and shadow planes respectively
06. The “base colors” are used to model the form, to try to get sense of the volume without using details
06. The “base colors” are used to model the form, to try to get sense of the volume without using details
07. With the base colors established I am now trying to extend the value/color range
07. With the base colors established I am now trying to extend the value/color range
08. I am differentiating the warm and cool passages in the face, also using complementary colors to help create contrast.
08. I am differentiating the warm and cool passages in the face, also using complementary colors to help create contrast.
09. I am beginning to look at the features and working on modeling the forms.
09. I am beginning to look at the features and working on modeling the forms.
10. I am trying to lock onto her likeness and character at this point and gently manipulating the edges between forms to get the right look
10. I am trying to lock onto her likeness and character at this point and gently manipulating the edges between forms to get the right look
14. I am now focusing on the eyes, nose and lips and trying to get her expression with as little changes as possible.
11. I am now focusing on the eyes, nose and lips and trying to get her expression with as little changes as possible.
15. almost no painting is happening at this stage, just comparing and making subtle shifts to edges and adding small spots of local color
12. almost no painting is happening at this stage, just comparing and making subtle shifts to edges and adding small spots of local color
16. Finally, I felt the body was distracting and not really adding anything to the study. In the last few moments with one or two sweeps of the rag I took out the upper body, leaving the more suggestive sketch from earlier.
13. Finally, I felt the body was distracting and not really adding anything to the study. In the last few moments with one or two sweeps of the rag I took out the upper body, leaving the more suggestive sketch from earlier.

Take one of Dominique Medici’s classes
at Chelsea Classical Studio
or at dominiquemedici.com

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Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016

Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
Rick Piloco 3 Hour Portrait Painting Demonstration – May 5, 2016
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Modeling the Figure By Robin Smith

Robin Smith Artists Magazine Drawing The Figure Demo
Robin Smith Artists Magazine Drawing The Figure Demo

MODELING THE FIGURE

By Robin Smith | Excerpt From “The Human Presence“, Artists Magazine, January/February 2015 by Ephraim Rubens (page 34-35)

Robin Smith Julie
Julie (oil on canvas, 48×30)

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MATERIALS

Drawing: extrasoft vine charcoal

Surface: thick, preprimed cotton duck or linen with additional acrylic gesso applied

Oils: mostly Old Holland, some Winsor & Newton

Palette: flake white (to mark lightest passages), Mars black (to correct the drawing), Naples yellow, cadmium lemon, cadmium yellow, cadmium orange, cadmium red, alizarin crimson, ultramarine blue, cerulean blue, viridian, yellow ochre, raw sienna, Winsor & Newton light red, raw umber, Vasari red umber

Brushes: Robert Simmons bristle brushes, Utrecht series 212 kolinsky sables, Princeton Snap! flats, filberts and brights of all sizes

Medium: Winsor & Newton Liquin

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Robin Smith Julie Step 1
Robin Smith Julie Step 1

1. Sketch in charcoal: With extra-soft vine charcoal, I loosely laid in the head, torso and a hint of the legs. I spent about three hours on this sketch, using plumb lines and abstracted angles to find proportional relationships between the body parts.

Robin Smith Julie Step 2
Robin Smith Julie Step 2

2. Establish proportions: Having laid in a loose approximation of the figure, I shifted to drawing with paint. I generally try to nail down the proportions of the head and facial features and then use those measurements to help me find the size of the torso and body parts.

Robin Smith Julie Step 3
Robin Smith Julie Step 3

3. Block in major shapes: I continued blocking in the figure. I like to establish my major value shapes early, massing in the shadow shapes broadly, looking for the big abstract shapes they make and filling in the background with color.

Robin Smith Julie Step 4
Robin Smith Julie Step 4

4. Push contrasts; explore volume: I deepened the background further to help bring out the effect of the bright light falling on the figure. I also explored the volumes of the model’s form, by letting my lines wrap around the figure in cross contours.

Robin Smith Julie Step 5
Robin Smith Julie Step 5

5. Set light values with white: I used a painting knife loaded with flake white to work out the light side of the face. I like painting with a knife because I can get fine lines with the side of the knife, make crisp triangular shapes with the flat trowel shape, or drag a loaded knife over dry paint. The thickness of the application allows me to go back in, scraping into the paint with the end of a brush handle or blending a thick application into a neighboring thinly painted area. I also like the expressiveness of thick paint. When this thick, whitish paint is dry, I often glaze over it with transparent color.

Robin Smith Julie Step 6
Robin Smith Julie Step 6

6. Address the darks: With the broad masses established, I began working out my dark accents. I looked for anatomical details and smaller plane changes.

Robin Smith Julie Step 7
Robin Smith Julie Step 7

7. Tune contrasts and harmonies: I started subduing some of my initial construction lines while looking for harmonies within the separate light and dark masses. I further darkened the background to increase its contrast where the upper part of the body faces the light.

Robin Smith Julie Step 8
Robin Smith Julie Step 8

8. Make final adjustments: I continued to develop the halftones and lights, building up the paint quality throughout the canvas. I added more mass, color and detail to the hair, shifted the subject’s right hand slightly and further developed both hands. I also added movement lines to the background. Here you see the completed piece Julie (oil on canvas, 48×30).

Robin Smith Julie
Julie (oil on canvas, 48×30)